• Creator
    Topic
  • #19915

    Nate Goode
    Spectator

    Hello,
    Glad you guys are back up and running.
    I have a couple questions about the blog shortcode:

    On occasion, when a page with the blog shortcode (grid mode) loads, it orphans the first post on its own row, although it only takes up one column, and loads any other posts on the 2nd column and lower. Is there a way to fix this?

    Is there a native way to colour the background of the relevant posts in the shortcode (grid again)? I thought I saw an option for it, but for the life of me can’t find it now. I’ve used CSS to colour the background .post-content-wrapper, but this leaves a thin strip transparent at the bottom of each post (inside the border).

    And last blog question: Are sticky posts supposed to be at the top of these blog shortcode calls (still grid)? We had a sticky that stayed up for a while, but now it’s going by date as though it weren’t sticky. Is it working as expected? Is there a fix for this?

    Finally (not about the blog), is there a way to set the page template default to the 100% width? We mostly don’t use sidebars, and would like to have that be our default if possible.

    Thanks guys, and again, glad you’ve ironed out whatever was going on what that DB error!

Viewing 7 replies - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
Replies
  • Denzel Chia
    Moderator
    Post count: 3230
    #19919 |

    Hi,

    Please post your website url to the pages that you are having issues.
    We need to take a look in order to provide possible solutions.

    Thanks!

    Nate Goode
    Spectator
    Post count: 6
    #19921 |
    This reply has been set as private.
    Imran
    Spectator
    Post count: 403
    #19944 |

    Hi Nate,

    Thanks for writing in!

    Firstly upon checking, the first post hasn’t been shown alone in the first row and neither the remaining posts shifts down after. However, please provide some screenshots with the issue.

    In regard to setting the background on your relevant posts, so you can use the custom code which you’ve used before and to eliminate the extra space under the post inside of the border, you can use the following code under Appearance > Theme Options > Custom Css:

    Lastly, the “regular times” post doesn’t seem to be sticky at my end, so would you mind confirming that you’ve chosen sticky option for the post.

    For achieving the full width page layout, you can try adding the following code into your custom CSS field:

    Thanks.

    Nate Goode
    Spectator
    Post count: 6
    #19947 |

    Hello, the code stuff worked great!

    I’ll grab a screenshot when the orphaned post issue comes up again; as I said, it doesn’t always happen, but I’ll copy it next time.

    The sticky post is definitely sticky. I turned it off and on, and it still doesn’t stick. I even created a new post to test stickiness and it too got sorted by date only, not sticky.

    Thanks

    Denzel Chia
    Moderator
    Post count: 3230
    #19951 |

    Hi,

    I just tested the sticky post in my localhost.
    The sticky post is working properly with the blog shortcode.

    I see that you have a comment in your webpage source code that begins with w3tc, which leads me to believe that you are using a cache plugin. You need to clear cache after updating, in order for new content to appear.

    This is a screenshot of my sticky post, which I changed to a date in 2007 just to make sure that it is sticky. http://prntscr.com/86c9ir

    This is a screenshot of the blog shortcode, which is working properly.
    http://prntscr.com/86c9qx

    The following is the shortcode I used for testing.

    Creating a MySQL Database for WordPress

    What is MySQL database?

    A database refers to a collection of organized data. In the case of a website, the data in question could range from posts and comments to usernames and their respective passwords. MySQL is a database management system. This means it helps you and other users store and retrieve different types of data from your website.

    What makes My SQL so popular?

    The total cost of ownership is low. This refers to the price of buying Oracle plus the cost of operating this program. Compared to most for-sale database programs MySQL is the cheapest option by far. Companies whose operations rely heavily on experimentation with apps and other web platforms spend less money using MySQL in the development of their products. This means that MySQL offers more value in the long run.

    Its performance is refined. Its open source nature has given rise to a cult-like following that reports bugs so as to provide solutions to bugs experienced in new releases of the year. Users are assured that the level of testing at MySQL headquarters has given rise to a product that honestly is the standard for database management.

    Its scalability is high which refers to its ability to handle increasing amounts of work. Simple websites with little traffic may not need to worry much about this. As websites start to grow and receive higher traffic (hundreds, thousands and even millions of views every day) as well as post much more content, they’ll need a more stable database manager to ensure everything is spic and span. MySQL fits the bill in this regard.

    MySQL is user-friendly since MySQL was designed in such a way that even the amateur web developers can figure out what to do without any issues. The quick wizards and the user guides will turn anyone into a MySQL Pro in no time. An added benefit is the fact that Oracle now owns MySQL. The experience and human capital from the tech giant, Oracle, combined with the input of MySQL community users assure users that the future updates will be elegant and powerful.

    How to create a MySQL database?

    Using shell

    Step 1

    Open command line as an administrator from the apps menu.

    Step 2

    Gain access to my SQLl by logging in. You would need to have an account in advance.

    Step 3

    Create the database by giving it a name

    Step 4

    Confirm that the database has been created with the instruction below

    Step 5

    Create a new user by giving them a name

    Step 6

    Give all privileges to the newly created user as well as assign a new password to them.

    Using Cpanel

    Cpanel is a web hosting program that uses icons and automated tools to make the process of web hosting simpler for both the beginners and the experienced webmasters.

    Step 1

    Access your Cpanel area.

    Step 2

    Select the MySQL databases option that is beside the MySQL database wizard option.

    Step 3

    Before going any further, you will be required to create a database name. Choose your database name and click Create Database. The next screen will be one which affirms that a new database with the name you have chosen has been created. Click the ‘go back’ button so as to be returned to the page that enables you to define the settings of your new database.

    Step 4

    Create a new user to enable you to access the database. Under ‘username,’ fill in the name you’d like to use for this user. Go ahead and create a secure login password for this particular user. If you have difficulty in coming up with a user, click on the password generator button. The program will generate a secure login password for you. Once you have filled in all the fields, click on the Create User button to save these settings.

    Step 5

    After receiving confirmation that a new user has been created, click ‘go back’ to get to the database settings area. Under the ‘Add User To Database’ section, fill in your previously created username. Under the database name, select the database name you’d like to register the user to in case you have more than one database.

    Step 6

    The next pop-up window will request you to select the privileges you would like to award to each user. After selecting the privileges, you’d have to assign the user and click the ‘make changes’ button to complete the process of creating your MySQL database with Cpanel.

     

    Using wizard

    ‘Wizards’ are programs with step by step procedures to help the less tech-savvy users to carry out tasks with much ease.

    Step 1

    After opening Cpanel, select the MySQL database wizard under the databases area. It will walk through the same process covered above, but with detailed descriptions and prompts to help you complete the process.

    Step 2

    Create a name for the new database. Select the Next Step button after entering the database name.

    Step 3

    You should create a username for the new user to access the database. You will also have to create a password through which the user will gain access to the database. Alternatively, you can just click the Password Generator button to help you create a secure password for the user. Having created a username and user password, press the Create User button to save your settings.

    Step 4

    The next step will require you to define the privileges assigned to the new user. Having selected all the privileges, you’d have to assign the privileges to the user and press the Next Step button for this purpose. You will receive a message confirming that your user has been added to MySQL database.

    Thanks!

    Nate Goode
    Spectator
    Post count: 6
    #20015 |

    Hello and thanks for looking,
    Yes, the host has a cache, but I clear it regularly.

    I did some more testing, and it appears that the sticky issue is related to the use of categories. It returns to working fine if the cat-slug field is blank, but if limited to certain categories, the sticky stops working. Is there a way around this, or should I limit to using exclude categories to keep things off of this feed?

    Thanks.

    Denzel Chia
    Moderator
    Post count: 3230
    #20033 |

    Hi,

    Sorry, I have no suggestions.
    Please use exclude categories if it works properly for you.

    Thanks!

Viewing 7 replies - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

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